SAINTS EUSTRATIUS, AUXENTIUS, EUGENE, MARDARIUS, ORESTES, MARTYRS AT SEBASTE AND SAINT LUCY, VIRGIN MARTYR OF SYRACUSE, FULL BODY 7280Home » Shop » Icons » Alpha » A - D » SAINTS EUSTRATIUS, AUXENTIUS, EUGENE, MARDARIUS, ORESTES, MARTYRS AT SEBASTE AND SAINT LUCY, VIRGIN MARTYR OF SYRACUSE, FULL BODY 7280

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SAINTS EUSTRATIUS, AUXENTIUS, EUGENE, MARDARIUS, ORESTES, MARTYRS AT SEBASTE AND SAINT LUCY, VIRGIN MARTYR OF SYRACUSE, FULL BODY

The Five Martyrs were from Greater Armenia. Like their ancestors, they worshipped Christ in secret; during the persecution of Diocletian, they presented themselves before the Forum authorities, and having been tormented in diverse manners, by Lysius the proconsul, three of them ended their lives in torments. As for Saints Eustratius and Orestes, they survived and were sent to Sebastia to Agricolaus, who governed the whole East; by his command these Saints, received their end as martyrs by fire in 296.

Saint Auxentius was a priest. Saint Eustratius was educated and an orator; he was the foremost among Lysius’ dignitaries and the archivist of the province. In the Synaxarion he is given the Latin title of scriniarius, that is, “keeper of the archives.” The prayer, “Magnifying I magnify Thee, O Lord,” which is read in the Saturday Midnight Service, is ascribed to him. In the Third Hour and elsewhere there is another prayer, “O Sovereign Master, God the Father Almighty,” which is ascribed to Saint Mardarius.


St Lucy (Lucia) was born of rich and noble parents about the year 283. Her father was of Roman origin, but his early death left her dependent upon her mother, Eutychia. Lucy consecrated her virginity to God, and she hoped to devote all her worldly goods to the service of the poor. The fame of the miraculous relics of the virgin-martyr Agatha, was attracting numerous visitors to her relics at Catania. Eutychia was therefore persuaded to make a pilgrimage to Catania, in the hope of being cured of a hæmorrhage, from which she had been suffering for several years. There she was in fact cured, and Lucy persuaded her mother to allow her to distribute a great part of her riches among the poor. This stirred the greed of the unworthy youth to whom Lucy had been unwillingly betrothed, and he denounced her to the Governor of Sicily. It was in the year 303, during the fierce persecution of Diocletian. She was first of all condemned to suffer the shame of prostitution; and then to be burned alive, but in both cases God spared her. Finally, she met her death by the sword.

Feast Day: 13th December

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